Tag Archives: SEO

Unlocking the Secret to Great SEO

For this week’s American Society of Plastic Surgical Nurses (ASPSN) meeting in Boston, two members of the RealPatientRatings team were asked to create poster presentations. 

Eva Sheie, our Director of Online Strategy, drew up on current research and many years of experience to develop this poster, titled Unlocking the Secret to Great SEO.

Today’s effective SEO strategy is centered around trust in two ways: trust built with Google, and trust built with patients considering your services. Find out which kinds of internet marketing can get you into trouble, and discover which tactics result in greater trust with both Google and patients to generate more conversions, more consults, and more cases.

Click this image to enlarge & download a printable PDF.
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SEO is Building Trust

Below are the slides from a recent presentation given to plastic surgeons and practice managers titled “SEO is Building Trust.”

Effective SEO strategy for any size market is centered around trust, in two ways:
  1. Trust built with Google
  2. Trust built with patients considering your services

There are so many different ideas about what SEO is out there and so many different ways of doing things. It’s important to understand that we from the perspective that every internet marketing activity you take on has to have be looked at through the same lens, which is that the primary goal is to increase conversions.

A good strategy does not rely on any single tactic; rather it relies on a variety of high quality sources of traffic so that if one tactic becomes irrelevant, the house isn’t a house of cards and it doesn’t fall down.

And most importantly, your main measure of success should not be by total number of visitors or how many keywords you have #1 rankings,only by conversions.  If you’re #1 for all kinds of things, but those aren’t things that patients actually care about, or worse, they land on your site and don’t get what they are looking for, then you’re investing time and money toward tactics that don’t have a good return.

The thing that’s hard to see about SEO is that a lot of SEO is “janitorial” in the sense that you clean stuff up, follow a technical protocol or a process – and just about anyone can do that part of it. It’s the part that has to do with building trust and getting conversions that can’t be done by just anyone. As surgeons, you certainly can relate to the concept that even if all of you do a surgery with the same basic technique, it may not turn out exactly the same way because the talent and skill of the person doing it really matters.

In person, trusting the doctor is pretty easy to do, but we’re not talking about in person here. We’re talking quite literally about getting a bunch of code and some words to convince Google to trust you, and we’re also talking about what appears on a computer screen or a mobile phone to build trust between you and a potential patient who is a complete stranger who hasn’t even had the opportunity to meet you in person yet.

It’s hard to read reports, it’s hard to dive into Google analytics and figure out what ‘s going on. You know what’s not hard to do anymore? You can have tracking data delivered right in the body of your website contacts that tells you exactly where the person came from, what they searched for, how many pages on your site they viewed, whether they read reviews or not… this is easy to get and over time you will see patterns and understand what’s working.

But most importantly, forget what you think you know and remember that you are what you publish and you get back what you put on the web.

The importance of content for SEO, explained in just TWO graphics

The nature of content you create affects users differently and can be categorized into four distinct categories: entertain, educate, persuade, convert.

Over a decade of testing various types of content with prospective patients has determined that patients who are ready to make an appointment require real reviews from past patients to move forward. The illustrations below further confirm our findings.

Depending on the type of business you have, you may not need all of the elements below. Medical practices, for instance, don’t need games! Review content presented to prospective patients results in a massive increase in conversions, along with content about price/cost. If your website doesn’t have these two content types, get going and add it now.

the-content-matrix

Brafton's Infographic: Why Content for SEO?

5 surprising things we learned about your patients in 2013

1. Time-related concerns are the #1 complaint in plastic surgery patient reviews

clockMost bad reviews are not complaints about the quality of results, but about the patient experience. Patients most often express sentiment within themes of time, communication, and money. They are frustrated by service and communication failures and their negative reviews focus on these issues.

But in 5-star (highly-satisfied) reviews, patients focus on their positive emotions, i.e., comfort, outcomes and next steps. They are happy and satisfied. They plan to stay in the practice and help it grow.

What to do: If you want to change the tone and content of future reviews, then you need to attack service problems at the source.

2. After restaurants, consumers read reviews of doctors and dentists more than any other category.

Most people read less than 10 reviews before forming an opinion of you, and they read less reviews before forming an opinion than they did a year ago. Nielsen recently reported that 68% of consumers trust online review content, and an astonishing 70% take action after reading consumer opinions posted online.

The only type of advertising to inspire more action than online reviews is a recommendation from a friend. Reviews are more powerful all other media including TV, websites, newspaper ads, email marketing, print ads, and billboards.

What to do: You need trustworthy, relevant, recent reviews. A lot of them.

3. Consumers require negative reviews to believe positive reviews

Thumbs-Up-Thumbs-DownPatients who rate their experience as neutral, dissatisfied, or highly dissatisfied represent only 4% of the survey totals for overall satisfaction.

A number of studies have determined that consumers require a small amount of negative feedback in order to confidently believe positive feedback.

What to do: Stop freaking out about negative reviews! (Easier said than done, we know…)

4. Proactive price education = stronger SEO, more leads, better consults, and more cases

Patients who are prepared for the cost are 21% more likely to schedule on the spot, at the end of their consult. Rather than worried about a financial surprise at the end of the consult, they are focused on absorbing your expertise about the procedure.

“Cost” and “Price” are two of the strongest keywords there are! Neglecting to include them on your website is costing you a pretty decent amount of web traffic. Just like in the consultation, a prospective patient visiting your website looks for cost information in order to move forward in their research process. If you answer their question, they can move on to learn about the procedure, look at your beautiful photos, and contact you for a consultation.

What to do: Put general price ranges on your website and share cost information over the phone before the caller asks.

5. Prospective patients who read reviews are ready to buy

A year’s worth of data gathered from 14 plastic surgery practice websites shows these visitors who read reviews at part of a visit convert at least twice as often as those who don’t. (In this case, “convert” simply means they completed a form on a website.)

What to do: If you want more leads, consults, and cases, add reviews to your own website.